Sonntag - 08. Dezember 2019

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Flightless birds are birds that lack the ability to fly. These species rely on running and/or swimming instead of flying, but evolved from flying ancestors. There are about forty species in existence today, the best known being the ostrich, emu, cassowary, rhea, kiwi, and penguin. Some birds evolved flightlessness in response to the release from predation, for example on oceanic islands, although this is likely not the case for the ratites (the ostrich, emu, cassowary, rhea and kiwi), as evolutionary origins suggest a continental biogeographical providence.
Wikipedia-Link: Flightless bird


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Angry Birds is a video game franchise created by Finnish computer game developer Rovio Entertainment. Inspired primarily by a sketch of stylized wingless birds, the first game was first released for Apple´s iOS in December 2009. Over 12 million copies of the game have been purchased from Apple´s App Store, which has prompted the company to design versions for other touchscreen-based smartphones, including the Android, Symbian and Windows Phone operating systems. It has since expanded to video game consoles and for PCs.
Wikipedia-Link: Angry Birds


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Takeoff is the phase of flight in which an aerospace vehicle goes from the ground to flying in the air. For aircraft that take off horizontally, this usually involves starting with a transition from moving along the ground (taxiing) on a runway. For balloons, helicopters and some specialized fixed-wing aircraft (VTOL aircraft such as the Harrier), no runway is needed. Takeoff is the opposite of landing.
Wikipedia-Link: Takeoff


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Parachuting, or skydiving, is the action sport of exiting an aircraft and returning to Earth with the aid of gravity while using a parachute to slow down during the terminal part of the descent. It may or may not involve a certain amount of free-fall, a time during which the parachute has not been deployed and the body gradually accelerates to terminal velocity.
A parachute is a device used to slow the motion of an object through an atmosphere by creating drag, or in the case of ram-air parachutes, aerodynamic lift. Parachutes are usually made out of light, strong cloth, originally silk, now most commonly nylon.
Wikipedia-Link: Parachuting + Parachute


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A helicopter is a type of rotorcraft in which lift and thrust are supplied by rotors. This allows the helicopter to take off and land vertically, to hover, and to fly forwards, backwards, and laterally. These attributes allow helicopters to be used in congested or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft would usually not be able to take off or land. The capability to hover efficiently for extended periods of time allows a helicopter to accomplish tasks that fixed-wing aircraft and other forms of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft cannot perform.
Wikipedia-Link: Helicopter + Rotorcraft


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A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first aircraft to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane design, as did most aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques and materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s. The tandem wing design differs in that one of the two wings is placed forward and the other aft, such that no horizontal stabiliser is necessary.
Wikipedia-Link: Biplane


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Military transport aircraft or military cargo aircraft are typically fixed and rotary wing cargo aircraft which are used to deliver troops, weapons and other military equipment by a variety of methods to any area of military operations around the surface of the planet, usually outside of the commercial flight routes in uncontrolled airspace.
Wikipedia-Link: Military transport aircraft


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An airport is a location where aircraft such as fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters, and blimps take off and land. Aircraft may be stored or maintained at an airport. An airport consists of at least one surface such as a runway for a plane to take off and land, a helipad, or water for takeoffs and landings, and often includes buildings such as control towers, hangars and terminal buildings. Larger airports may have fixed base operator services, seaplane docks and ramps, air traffic control, passenger facilities such as restaurants and lounges, and emergency services. A military airport is known as an airbase or air station.
Wikipedia-Link: Airport


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A legend (Latin, legenda, "things to be read") is a narrative of human actions that are perceived both by teller and listeners to take place within human history and to possess certain qualities that give the tale verisimilitude. Legend, for its active and passive participants includes no happenings that are outside the realm of "possibility", defined by a highly flexible set of parameters, which may include miracles that are perceived as actually having happened, within the specific tradition of indoctrination where the legend arises, and within which it may be transformed over time, in order to keep it fresh and vital, and realistic.
Wikipedia-Link: Legend + Legendary (video game)


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Birds (class Aves or clade Avialae) are feathered, winged, bipedal, endothermic (warm-blooded), egg-laying, vertebrate animals. With around 10,000 living species, they are the most speciose class of tetrapod vertebrates. All present species belong to the subclass Neornithes, and inhabit ecosystems across the globe, from the Arctic to the Antarctic. Extant birds range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) Bee Hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) Ostrich.
Wikipedia-Link: Bird


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A paper plane, paper aeroplane (UK), paper airplane (US), paper glider, paper dart or dart is a toy aircraft, usually a glider made out of paper or paperboard; the practice of constructing paper planes is sometimes referred to as aerogami (Japanese: kamihikoki), after origami, the Japanese art of paper folding.
Wikipedia-Link: Paper plane


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Wallace and Gromit is a British stop motion comedy film series. Created by Nick Park of Aardman Animations, the series consists of four animated short films and a feature-length film. The series centres on Wallace, an absent-minded inventor and cheese enthusiast, and his companion Gromit, an anthropomorphic intelligent dog. The duo live in Wigan, Greater Manchester, UK. Wallace is primarily voiced by veteran actor Peter Sallis, and alternatively by Ben Whitehead when Sallis is not available. Gromit remains silent, communicating only through facial expressions and body language.
Wikipedia-Link: Wallace and Gromit
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